Actual bloom day photos – Phlomis, Aruncus, Nectaroscordum

On bloom day/Fathers Day, I found a little time to actually take some pictures. (And tonight I learned I’ve been misspelling Nectaroscordum for years.)

Phlomis, Knautia, Scotch thistle and more ’round the blue bottles.
Phlomis and more

Umbrella plant and Tradescantia
Umbrella plant and Tradescantia

I’ve yet to take a picture of goatsbeard (Aruncus) that does it justice.
goatsbeard (Aruncus)

I’ll keep trying.
goatsbeard (Aruncus)

Nectaroscordum is pretty plain — until you move in close.
goatsbeard (Aruncus)

goatsbeard (Aruncus)

goatsbeard (Aruncus)

goatsbeard (Aruncus)

goatsbeard (Aruncus)

goatsbeard (Aruncus)

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7 thoughts on “Actual bloom day photos – Phlomis, Aruncus, Nectaroscordum”

  1. Ah, THAT’s what didn’t come up for me this year–the nectaroscordum! And they’re supposed to smell sweet and attract lots of beneficials… is that the case? Yours are beautiful. And I adore the scotch thistle, and the “metal corkscrew reeds” in the blue bottle garden, too.

    I’m glad I’m not the only one who can’t take a photo that does justice to the goatsbeard. I keep trying, too, but mine aren’t even close enough to yours to post.

  2. Kim: Most folks think nectaroscordum has an objectionable, garlic-y smell. Again, I’m not very sensitive to fragrance. So it’s neither here nor there. I’ve heard recommendations not to plant it under a window.

    With the goatsbeard, I think I need to get out a tripod and use a long exposure to get a good depth of field with a long exposure on a still day. Still, I’m not sure I’ll every catch that glow it has, especially when blooms are still a little green.

    Someday.

  3. Nectaroscordum? What now, huh? I’ve been calling it Allium bulgaricum. Am I woefully behind the times? Ours did a funny thing this year and went all dry and crispy before fully opening. Sad about that. They’re one of my very faves for being so subtly stunning and you’re pictures are perfect.

  4. Hi Kris:

    I don’t think I discovered Nectaroscordum until after the name changed — at least in the bulb catalogs.

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